tangentialism is David Yee!

Things I've written

It occurred to me as I rebuilt this site that I've lost a lot of writing from the various platforms I've stood on over the years. In addition to anything newer I write here, I've selected some of that stuff (not all good, but all notable to me) for republishing here, grouped according to the blog that hosted it.

New stuff

How I knew my grandmother and her food
“She, my father, and my aunts speak in Chinese while my brother and I sit on the floor and eat all the oranges.”
Twenty internet things I like, in penitence for complaining
“Dark days come and go, but Friday should be sacrosanct.”

The dothatthing years

Posts from a Tumblr blog that lived at do.tthatthing.org from 2007 to 2013, when that domain was stolen by an SEO domain squatter jerk.

The day we announced Editorially
“I was raised to be an editor, but I always wanted to be a writer.”
The day I left 20×200
“The culture of startups is overflowing with mythical personae of pirates and ninjas, but I’m not a pirate—I’m an evangelist and a plumber.”
The day I met my wife
“That was the last moment in my life that I did not know her.”
A post about creative play and, in hindsight, the ephemerality of startups
“The craft of celebrating amateurism is one of the most fruitful community acts there is—in no small part because there are so many of us.”
Even though we had a great caterer, we ate pizza on our wedding night
“Cake, drinking, dancing, amazing—best wedding ever, swear to god.”
Something I wrote the day that Steve Jobs died
“To have Jobs as a role model is, at its essence, to take on the challenge of continually trying the impossible.”
The only thing I’ve written about September 11th
“In 2001, I was twenty-seven. I am thirty-seven today.”
The first major magazine switches to digital, and I have opinions
“The hard step for magazine publishers has always been jumping in that cold pool of ‘here’s my entire magazine, no mailbox required.’”
Just before Barack Obama is elected President, I talk about what it means that we are both mixed-race kids
“He has to fall on one side or another of that fence, but what would that have meant to his grandmother?”
Three things the New York Times reported on from a single day in 1876
“Charles Gilbert, an Orange newsdealer, stole $500 from his wife’s trunk yesterday, and, it is supposed, has gone to Europe.”

The classic years

Posts from a Movable Type blog I hosted at Tangentialism from 2004 to 2006.

A post about how technology is eating away at my memory
“I think the connected life is reprogramming my brain to better serve my devices, games, and the Internet, and my memories of life as I once knew it are just the first victims.”
Strangely, the only blog post I have ever written about a cheeseburger
“I really should have called a second time.”
What I like about John Cage
“The week I started college at Bard was the week John Cage died.”

The wiki years

Entries from a non-chronological wiki-based blog that existed from 2003 to 2004. Ambitious and sort of insufferable. The dates for each post are approximations.

About the coffee-shop-slash-record-store-slash-club that defined my twenties
“I cannot think of a more relaxing way to pencil out one-seventh of one's nightlife than by sitting next to a subwoofer and eating cupcakes in Brooklyn's communal living room.”
I whine about winter
“You wake up with winter, and there's nothing to distract you until Valentine's Day.”
I predict the death of vinyl records
“Peer-to-peer file sharing is a knife in the gut of the corporate dance music industry, but it's not the killer—the industry is killing itself.”
The first project I never finished, which ended up becoming the first blog I ever kept
“The river of conversation is only the sum of its tributaries.”
The day I moved to New York City
“It was nine p.m.; I realized that I would spend my first night in New York alone, in the dark.”
A blog post about Brooklyn in which I am appalled about rents that today seem comically low
“Brooklyn is long stretches of quiet street, proud distance, and hopeful sacrifice.”
Something I wrote about an early peer-to-peer music sharing site—still vastly better than today's services
“Entire catalogs of small labels and under-appreciated musicians were enshrined on Audio Galaxy, distributed to a new generation of listeners whose encyclopedic knowledge of 1960's African Funk could challenge Fela Kuti himself.”